Category Archives: Google AdWords Course

Google Ads – Why you Need to Use Broad Match Modifier

Google Ads (formerly known as Google AdWords) recently introduced ‘Broad Match Modifier’ that lets you create keywords that are more targeted than broad match, yet have a greater reach than phrase or exact match.

With modified broad match, you put a plus sign (+) in front of one or more words in a broad match keyword. The words that are preceded by a (+) sign must appear in the user’s keyword phrase exactly or as a close variation.

The words that are not following a (+) sign will trigger ads on more significant query variations.

This feature can drive more traffic than phrase or exact match, and attract more qualified traffic than broad match.

What are examples of modified broad match phrases?

Say your broad match phrase was “red purses.” That phrase could prompt ads on relevant query variations like “red bags,” “colorful purses,” “women’s clutches,” etc.

But if your modified broad match was “+red purses,” the word red or some close variant would have to appear in the keyword phrase.

Close variants include misspellings, singular/plural forms, abbreviations and acronyms and stemming.

So the query “redd purses” or “reddish bags,” for example, could trigger your ad.

If you made your modified broad match “red +purses,” the word purse or some close variant would have to appear in the keyword phrase. Examples include “colorful purses,” “colorful purse,” or “women’s purrses.”

Hasn’t Google Ads had a feature like this before?

Google Ads hasn’t had a feature quite like this one, though years ago Google’s broad match was more targeted than its current broad match.

Broad match meant that words in a keyphrase could appear in any order in a query. Eventually Google switched over to its current version of broad match, and many people complained.

They felt that Google prompted ads for terms that weren’t necessarily relevant, requiring them to draw up long negative keyword lists.

One WebmasterWorld forum user complained, for example, that he saw queries as exotic as “zebras near chicago” for “widgets near chicago.”

How do I enable modified broad match?

Go into your Google Ads account, click on the Keywords tab, and select the keyword phrase you want to edit. Click on the current match type in the Type column and choose modified broad match from the drop-down menu. Add the necessary (+) signs to the keyword phrase.

How do I know if modified broad match is a good idea for my campaign?

If you decide to give it a try, make sure you track how your campaign performance evolves. See, for example, how your clicks, CPCs, conversions, return on investment, and so on change. Google notes in its broad match modifier overview that you can produce a performance report that just details information about modified broad match keywords.

If modified broad match keywords seem to be improving your ROI, then stick with them. If not, stay with broad match, phrase match, or exact match.

[Click on the screenshot below to enlarge it]

Google Ads - Why you Need to Use Modified Broad Match Modifier

Sources:

5 Easy But Effective Ways to Optimize your PPC Keywords >

Top 9 AdWords Mistakes You Really Need To Avoid >

What Is Modified Broad Match? Using the Broad Match Modifier in PPC >

Understanding the Long Tail of Keyword Demand

Understanding the Long Tail of Keyword Demand

It all begins with words typed into a search box.

Keyword research is one of the most important, valuable, and high return activities in the search marketing field. Ranking for the “right” keywords can make or break your website. Through the detective work of puzzling out your market’s keyword demand, you not only learn which terms and phrases to target with SEO, but also learn more about your customers as a whole.

It’s not always about getting visitors to your site, but about getting the right kind of visitors. The usefulness of this intelligence cannot be overstated – with keyword research you can predict shifts in demand, respond to changing market conditions, and produce the products, services, and content that web searchers are already actively seeking. In the history of marketing, there has never been such a low barrier to entry in understanding the motivations of consumers in virtually every niche.

Let’s assume we have an online shoe store. It would be great to rank #1 for the keyword “shoes” – or would it?

The Search Demand Curve-Understanding the Long Tail of Keyword Demand

It’s wonderful to deal with keywords that have 5,000 searches a day, or even 500 searches a day, but in reality, these “popular” search terms actually make up less than 30% of the searches performed on the web. The remaining 70% lie in what’s called the “long tail” of search. The long tail contains hundreds of millions of unique searches that might be conducted a few times in any given day, but, when taken together, they comprise the majority of the world’s demand for information through search engines.

Another lesson search marketers have learned is that long tail keywords often convert better, because they catch people later in the buying/conversion cycle. A person searching for “shoes” is probably browsing, and not ready to buy. On the other hand, someone searching for “best price on Air Jordan size 12” practically has their wallet out!

The Search Demand Curve-Understanding the Long Tail of Keyword Demand 2

Illustrating the Long Tail >